Tag Archives: make your own

How to Make Your Own Harvest Centrepiece

With Thanksgiving and similar harvest-themed festivities coming to many parts of the world this month, one of the best-selling and most popular requests we receive is for a harvest-themed centrepiece for the table. Often, of course, people want to purchase the flowers and attempt the bouquet themselves. In the spirit of holiday giving, let me explain how it’s done. You can thank me later. 🙂

First, the flowers. You’ll want anything with fall colours. Some flowers are traditional for this, including sunflowers, orange mums, bronze cremons, orange tulips, red hypericum, and so forth. Color is more important that species here, so go with dark green backdrops and muted pastels in red, gold, brown, orange, and so forth. Accents should be with very dark colors (dark, woody browns are a good choice) and frosty whites rather than bright colors. Leaves such as oak, eucalyptus, and similar are also popular accents, as are well-proportioned pine cones. Use your creativity.

Start with a good dish or vase to either complement the colors or of glass to show off the colors in the stems. Shape to be short and broad or tall and fluffy. You’ll need some fishing line or thin wire to tie some of this together. You can use foam, candles, and other items to create a base if your dish is wide. Whether tall or short, begin with a base of flora that comes from your background and light accent options. Your leaves and eucalyptus, for example, are a good start here.

From there, continue building the base upwards and add accents to create splashes or groups of color. Your goal should be to create a semi-natural pattern of color mixes without going overboard with the accents or the base. Remember that just because you have something to add in doesn’t necessarily mean it needs to be added. Build gradually rather than in chunks.

It’s rare that someone makes an ugly centerpiece if they’re starting with items that have the right color combinations. You’re not likely to make it look bad, so don’t be afraid to experiment and play around with the arrangement. Even professionals often step back and say “hmm.. maybe less of that” and make changes after they’ve completed their work.

Try your hand at it and let me know how it goes.

Until next time,
Ken Bolt