Tag Archives: Flowers

Wildflowers

What is a Wildflower?

Wildflower isn’t an exact term, it’s a way to explain a native species. And since there are so many species of wildflowers and plants, we’re just going to talk about 3 of them that are native to North America. The Alberta Wild Rose, Gaillardia, and the Buttercup.

Alberta Wild Rose (Rosa acicularis)

The Alberta Wild Rose, also known as the prickly wild rose, the prickly rose and the wild rose. Is a deciduous shrub that grows 1-3m tall and the leaves are pinnate, 7-14cm long with 3-7 leaflets. The flowers are pink (rarely white) and are 3-5cm in diameter. This rose species is native to the U.S. and Canadian norther Great Prairies and is the provincial flower of Alberta.

Gaillardia (Blanket Flower)

The Gaillardia is in the Sunflower family and native to North and South America. Many cultivars have been bred for ornamental use and are an annual or perennial herb or subshrub. The stem is usually branching and erect to a maximum height of around 80cm. And they’re almost any shade of yellow, orange, red, purple, brown, which or bicoloured.

Buttercup (Ranunculus)

The Buttercup usually flowers in spring but can be found throughout the summer. They’re mostly a perennial but occasionally they’re both annual or biannual. The Buttercup has 5 yellow, greenish or white petals making it a very recognizable flower.

What to we do with Wildflowers?

Wildflowers can be used for any purpose and they create a different tone or style to any event. You can be creative as you want, from your garden to bouquets. Deign you’re own arrangements with us, or let us come up with something for you. We have a wide selection of flowers and are happy to help you. 

Autumn Flowers

With all the leaves on the trees changing colour and the crisp cool air, Autumn is a wonderful season. And along with the changing leaves, our gardens change as well. The types if flowers that bloom are often different than the ones we saw during the spring and summer months. There’s a large variety of flowers and plants that make their appearance during the fall.

When is the best time to plant Autumn flowers? Well that can depend of the temperature in August. Planting early in the season (summer) will make sure that your garden is well established. But it’s a good idea to play it by ear, because it all depends on the temperature. Fall flowers bloom late, but they bloom best if they have been in the garden all season. Some examples of Autumn flowers are Balloon Flowers, Mums, Stonecrop, and Sunflower Perennials.

Ballon Flowers (Platycodon grandiflorus) are in the campanula or bellflower family. They start out as a puff or bubble and pop open when they’re ready to bloom. It’s colours are lavender-blue, pale pink, or white. This flower spreads slowly, filling in without becoming a nascence. And other than cutting the plants back in the spring or fall, there is no other maintenance required.

Mums (Chrysanthemum) comes in many varieties but the best one to plant for fall would be the hardier Mum. This plant should be purchased in the spring so that it is ready in time for the fall season. Keep them well watered and mulch them once the ground freezes. They come in a variety of colours such as, white, yellow, pink, lavender, red, and bronze. This flower lasts all the way until November in some climates.

Stonecrop (Sedum sp) or often called the “Autumn Joy” looks good all year and requires minimal attention, but if you live near a Deer population watch out because they love to eat Stonecrop. So be aware of your surroundings before planting this lovely flower. They come in shades of pink and mauve. This plant is usually left standing tall throughout the winter months.

Sunflower Perennials (Helianthus hybrids) are related to the Sunflower. However, they don’t get a large, or topple over like a Sunflower and look more like a Daisy. They bloom towards the end of the season and come in a yellowish colour. They grow much slower than the Annual Sunflower and they will come back every year.

What will you plant for your garden this Autumn? It’s good to get your garden planned out and planted in August. Whether you’re planting a new garden or adding to your current one, fall flowers need time. Autumn is such a beautiful time of year and what a better way to celebrate the season than with a beautiful garden.

History of Flowers Arrangements

We all love flowers, how they can transform any room, how they smell, how they can make us feel. But who thought to put flowers in an arrangement? Why do we arrange them the way we do today? Where did the various styles come from? Lets explore the history of the flower arrangement.

It’s truly fascinating when exploring the history of flower arrangements, it was the ancient Egyptians that actually started arranging flowers. Egyptians were decorating with flowers as early as 2500 BCE and regularly placed cut flowers in vases and in highly styled arrangements. Flower arrangements were also used for burials, processions and simply to decorate their tables. Flowers used during this time were selected according to symbolic meaning and with an emphasis on a religious meaning.

The Greeks and Romans also used flowers and herbs for decorations. They didn’t commonly use vases but focused on using garlands and wreaths. They used a lot of plant based materials such as, olive branches and terracotta. It was also common for them to toss flower petals on the floors and beds. The most popular foliage used by the Greeks and Romans were acorns, oak leaves, ivy, parsley and laurel wreaths. The laurel wreaths were presented to winners of ancient Olympic competitions and in the home they symbolized a military victory. And just like the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans often used flower petals on the floors but and also at banquets.

The Chinese have a history of flower arrangements as well, dating as far back as the 207 BCE to 220 BEC in the Han era. Flowers were a component of religious teaching and medicine. Practitioners of Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism would place flowers at their alters, a practice that dates back to 618 to 906 CE. During the Byzantine Empire (500-1453 CE) contributions to the flower arrangement were made as well. This would typically include a cone shape design. The foliage was also placed in chalices and urns, which were usually decorated with brightly coloured flowers and fruit. And the flowers that were commonly used in their arrangements were, lilies, cypress, coronations and pine.

Now lets take a look at what Europe was doing around 1100 CE. This was when it was popular in churches and monasteries to use flowers and plants for decoration. During the middle ages monasteries had gardens with pharmaceutical products needed for “cures.” They often had associations applying to a spiritual bases as well as a medical one. During the Renaissance you would see flower arrganmnts represented in paintings, they were a very impressive and popular art form.

Now if we want to skip ahead a little we can explore what they were doing during the Georgian and Victorian eras. These eras are when arrangements were becoming even more popular. And they were also much more formal, symmetrical and tightly arranged with a variety of flowers. Oriental design was also very popular and influential because of trade. Small handheld arrangements were common during this time and they were called tussie-mussies. Their purpose was to help mask the smells of the street, since they didn’t have proper drainage systems. People would carry these small arrangements with them as they walked around the city.

During the Victorian era it became fashionable to have flowers in the home. Large masses of flowers were placed closely and tightly into containers to create compact arrangements. These arrangements were asymmetrical and stacked tightly together. There was no defined style, they were often unplanned using many different colours. The tussie-mussie was still popular during the Victorian era to provide relief from the odours of the city. At the end of this period there were attempts to create proper arrangements, which became an artful skill/profession in Europe.

Finally we come to the Italian Renaissance, a period which helped to give an extra boost to the art of flower arranging in Europe. During this time there was a wide variety of arrangement styles that began to develop. By the 15th and 16th centuries, flower arrangements were much more common and a large variety of materials were available to make containers such as, marble, heavy Venetian glass and bronze. Flower arrangements made during this time also had a focus on creating colour contrast. Some popular flowers included, Lilies, pinks, iris, jasmine, pansies, French marigolds and rosemary.

Flower arrangements still serve many of the same purposes today as they did then. They are used for decoration, celebrations, memorials and sometime simply making someones day a bit brighter. We hope you’ve enjoyed this brief history on how it all began. Flowers hold a lot of emotions and can invoke emotions, they are beautiful and wonderful to have around. There doesn’t need to be a reason to have them in your home, it’s simply enough to just enjoy them everyday. 

 

3 Ways to Celebrate Canada’s 150th Anniversary

This year marks Canada’s 150th birthday! If you live in Canada or perhaps have Canadian roots, it is definitely time to celebrate and there are no shortage of ways to show your Canadian pride and have fun!

Celebrate Canada With a Festive Floral Bouquet

Flowers are perfect for just about every celebration. A bouquet made with Canada’s national colours of red and white is particularly appropriate for Canada Day. A beautiful choice is this Hugs and Kisses Bouquet With Red Roses. The colour scheme jives perfectly with that of the Canadian flag. This lovely bouquet is made up of red roses, red mini carnations, pink carnations and white daisy spray chrysanthemums. Beautiful greenery finishes the display and the flowers are delivered in a lavish red vase.

Brant Florist Canada Day floral bouquet

Celebrate Canada with these gorgeous Red Miniature Carnations and White Daisies. This aesthetically stunning bouquet is carefully arranged to provide the ultimate visual impact. The flowers are grouped in a “d” glass cube. The rich red mini carnations and pure white daisies are the perfect hues to celebrate Canada’s birthday. Place a couple miniature Canadian flags in these flowers for a patriotic touch and proudly display them in your living room window, on your dining room table or another visible area.

Get out and celebrate Canada’s 150th by attending a family-fun event. There are so many events and activities happening right across the country and we’ve picked out a few of our top choices:

1. Enjoy Rendez-Vous 2017 in Quebec City

Head on out to Rendez-Vous 2017 to commemorate Canada’s history. This event takes place from July 18 to July 23 with more than 40 majestic Tall Ships sailing through various ports to reach Quebec City for a few days of fun-filled family activities! The historic Quebec City is the central rallying point for a 7,000 nautical mile transatlantic race that honours Canada’s 150th birthday. This is an amazing opportunity to experience the gorgeous Tall Ships in person.

2. Take in the La Machine Performance in the Nation’s Capital of Ottawa

Ottawa has a multitude of activities planned to celebrate. One of the more unique events is the La Machine performances, running between July 26 to July 30. Ottawa will play host to the North American debut as part of the yearlong celebration of our nation’s 150th birthday. La Machine is a science fiction story with some truly spectacular mechanical creatures roaming the streets of Ottawa. There is even a gigantic dragon that breathes fire! Great for all ages!

3. Visit Canada Place in Vancouver

Vancouver will welcome over one million people for this year’s Canada Place event between July 1 and July 3 to celebrate! The Canada Place event is the largest Canada Day celebration, aside from those in Ottawa. Fun events are planned for all ages including a sure-to-be spectacular fireworks show, the Canadian Forces Zone, a citizenship ceremony and plenty of yummy food trucks!

Happy 150th Birthday, Canada!

Floral bouquet for Canada Day by Brant Florist

Brant Florist is proud to be Canadian and we look forward to making your Canada Day celebration even more memorable with a gorgeous bouquet. Each of our floral arrangements is hand made with the ultimate attention to detail. Our team even provides a customized note with each bouquet to make it as personalized as possible. Contact us today and place your order by phone at 877-545-5535 , by e-mail at info@brantflorist.com or order online by visiting our website at www.brantflorist.com.   We accept most credit cards, Pay Pal and Interac Online. Order your flower bouquet from us today!