Spring Weddings

Hi there, it’s Ken Bolt from Brant Florist and Spring time seems to bring on the wedding bells. This time of year is about renewal, but it’s also, traditionally, one of the most popular wedding seasons. The months of April, May and June are the most-chosen wedding dates if the year, with each being bigger than the last, and the “June Bride” idea creating the pinnacle.

Often, the newlyweds-to-be focus heavily on the bridal bouquet and the table arrangements. This leaves out the other arrangements that are likely to populate the wedding as well, including the groom’s boutonniere and bridesmaid’s corsages. Quite often, as a florist, we base these other arrangements on the bridal bouquet. Recently, though, things were reversed.

Pink Rose Splendor Bouquet

Pink Rose Splendor Bouquet

A couple, planning a wedding in May, approached us with their plans, asking for a wedding arrangement bid. Talking with them, it became obvious that most of the focus was not on the tables or the bride, but on the groom’s colour choices. The wedding was largely traditional in terms of who would wear what, where things would be placed, and so forth. What was different was that the groom’s family was extremely traditional in terms of the colours associated with their surname, which the bride would be taking, and thus all arrangements should reflect those three basic colours.

This turned out to make the bidding process far easier, since arrangement proposals were far easier to narrow down and thus create within a budget. It also meant creativity was needed in big measure, as it’s difficult to create arrangements which cannot include any green (part of the colour requirements).

Whatever a wedding requires, it should be unique in some way. That’s how we try to approach it. Even “cookie-cutter” weddings should have something uniquely about the participants. In this case, that was easy, and it provides an interesting idea for re-focus when considering wedding style.

Until next time,

Ken Bolt

Spring Is The Meme

Hi there, it’s Ken Bolt from Brant Florist and being a florist, spring is, of course, one of my favourite times of year. Along with summer, fall, and winter, of course. Like most people, I generally claim the current, burgeoning season or the season that seems opposite of the one we’re in the middle of, to be my favourite. Taken as a whole, I suspect I like all seasons the same amount, just in different ways. In the heat of summer, winter’s chill seems like a far off blessing, but in the wet of spring, the more muted beauty of fall might seem more likeable. It’s all about perception.

But we’re coming into spring, so that’s the current topic of conversation. Easter flowers, seedlings, tulips, daffodils, April showers and the beauty and freshness of spring flowers is always a welcomed change! Online, of course, Spring is the Meme, with Facebook posts and tweets being all about how Easter is really from Ishtar and flowers don’t actually bloom now, but actually do so underground, or some other thing that is largely based on semantics or who’s historical perspective you’re asking for. Like most memes, it’s full of truth and expectation, but may not be completely accurate.

Basket Of Beauty Bouquet by Teleflora

Basket Of Beauty Bouquet by Teleflora

Take the whole “tulips come in April” thing. I hear a lot of that. It’s only true for very specific regions, though. While the green of the plants may poke through the soil in April, having actual tulips and other spring flowers blooming is unlikely unless you live in the Southern U.S.A. For most of us, tulips begin blooming in very late April and early May instead.

Still, Spring is the Meme and right now, it’s my happiest time of year. What with all the greenery sprouting, Easter Floral arrangements, people getting new lightness of being, and with less cabin fever being the norm. In a couple of weeks, of course, I’ll probably not like spring as much and be looking forward to summer with its predictable warmth and easier gardening.

Until next time,

Ken Bolt

Springtime Rituals

greeting_card_thinking_of_you_flower

Hi there, it’s Ken Bolt from Brant Florist and every spring, I go through the same rituals. As do many others, I’ve learned. We all know the cliche of “spring cleaning” and of throwing open doors and windows on sunny days, despite the chill, to air things out and freshen things up. Most of us do this, of course.Many, however, have their own little rituals on top of that. One of mine is renewed contacts. I have many extended family members and friends who are normally only seen around the holidays of late fall and winter. I see these cousins, old friends, and so forth for Thanksgiving or perhaps Christmas, and that may be all for the year.

So I make it a point in March or April to reach out to those people to keep the connection strong. Summer is a busy time for everyone, making this reaching out harder to do, so spring is just a better time. Plus, renewal and hope are on everyone’s mind as a natural course of things at this time of year, which also facilitates the connection.

If you don’t have a ritual of writing notes, making cards, sending flowers, or otherwise connecting with distant loved ones in the spring, maybe it should become your new springtime ritual. Take a break from the carpet beating, floor scrubbing, trash tossing, and window opening to sit down for a while and connect with your distant friends and family.

Heck, invite them over to help clean as a vacation from their own spring ritual. :)

Until next time,

Ken Bolt

http://BrantFlorist.com

+1-877-545-5535 (Toll-free voice in the U.S. and Canada)
+1-905-639-7001 (Outside the U.S. and Canada)

The Daffodil in March

product_flowers_iris_and_daffodils_roll1
Hi there, it’s Ken Bolt from Brant Florist and the birth flower for March is the daffodil, though in some cultures it’s the jonquil instead. The daffodil symbolizes love because the most common colour for the daffodil in the wild is bright yellow, symbolizing the sun of springtime and its warmth as well as the babies that so often come at this time of year in nature.I’m a huge fan of the daffodil. It’s sprightly, loves to “go large,” and is instantly recognized by just about everyone who sees it. Name a person who doesn’t know the meaning behind a daffodil and you’re naming someone who lives a dull life.

Many also see the jonquil as a flower for March, but in Western culture, it is often used in funerals as a conveyor of sympathy, which I feel is counter to the message of spring. Like many flowers, the jonquil has been misrepresented due to our cultural use of it, of course, but this does change its appeal regardless.

What is your favourite springtime flower? There are many of them.

Until next time,

Ken Bolt

http://BrantFlorist.com

+1-877-545-5535 (Toll-free voice in the U.S. and Canada)
+1-905-639-7001 (Outside the U.S. and Canada)